Category filter: Minimal

Tea House

I meant to post this along time ago, but it just sort of floated in my drafts until today. This design for a Tea House by David Jameson Architects is an amazing act of simplicity. The minimalist approach truly does justice to the history and practice of tea as it is done in Japan. I also really appreciate this building from the standpoint of it being a great solution to designing a simple and small out building. Albeit the huge i-beams seem a tad excessive.

(via NOTCOT »)

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Midget & Giant

I love the way Midget & Giant by Ryuji Nakamura artfully improves a piece technology. This webcam add-on for your Mac is a fabulous example of making something more fun and interesting with a simple paper house structure. The image it makes from the inside is even cooler than the view of it perched at the top of your monitor.

(via The Best Part »)


Houses of the Hudson Valley

After coming across the work of Thomas Phifer in Dwell this week I immediately signified with his minimalist style with a focus on light open spaces. Another thing I that really stood out to me was his residential commissions are located in pockets in close proximity to one another. The group that caught my attention the most are the houses in the Hudson Valley. I grew up in Columbia County and the Berkshires and all the towns these homes are in bring up nostalgic memories from my childhood.

(via Dwell »)

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Mini Maison

This beautiful conversion of a row worker’s house in Brussels, by architects Vanden Eeckhoudt-Creyf‘s is a beautiful exercise in efficiency. Taking a small space like this Mini Maison and organizing it in such a way that it feels airy and open while still separating the different spaces of the house is a feet of skill. I really love the way they have pushed some of the modern elements to the exterior of the building, thus giving passersby a glimpse at the modern aesthetic of the interior.

(via NOTCOT »)

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Layered House

This home, named suitably as, Layered House was designed by Jun Igarashi Architects. The naming refers to the fabric partitions, which separate and define the different rooms and purposes throughout the otherwise open plan house. These architects are also the minds behind Asahikada Garage I posted back in December.

(via CubeMe »)

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Al Kimiya Typeface

Designers Benjamin Varin and Pierre Ferrandez have created this sans-serif typeface called Al Kimiya, based on alchemical symbols. This is a great example of adaptation and the use of reference material to create something wholely different. In the end product, besides the set up glyphs that are infact alchemical symbols, the typeface only hints at the symbols it is derived from.

(via Swiss Legacy »)

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AisleOne 2011 Calendar Wallpapers

Antonio Carusone of AisleOne has just released his 2011 desktop wallpaper calendar, which breaks the year up into 3 wallpapers. They come in on size of 1920×1200, which should accomodate most displays.
The design fits Antonio’s minimalist design style and he has chosen to have the color get darker as the year progresses. Download the zip file with all three wallpapers.


Horai Onsen Bath House

To design a structure that defines itself as man made and separate from nature, but also lives in harmony with the landscape sounds impossible. Architects Kengo Kuma and Associates have accomplished just that with their design for the serene Horai Onsen Bath House.

(via SUBTILITAS »)

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Frts & Ygrt

This project by Mika Kanive is probably the most radical and amazing packaging design I have seen in a very long time. The concept, which is evidently executed to perfection, is to communicate to the consumer the quality of the contents as well as how delicious they are. No bright colored gradients, cloak and daggers type design here. Just a simple idea, which highlights what you are should actually be paying for.

(via The Fox Is Black »)


Domestique

Domestique is a historic cycling journal. You will find clippings, images, random filings and general romantic cycling non-sense filling these pages. Most likely you won’t find much about carbon, expensive modern components or the like, but once in a while we get a little self-indulgent. Think of it as a history book, but a hell of a lot less boring.”

I couldn’t really some it up better myself. This is a great blog with awesome historic cycling content and a nice minimalist design to boot.


Serif Bag

Generally I feel that there are too many tote bags in the world. I understand the good will of replacing one time use shopping bags with a potentially more permanent solution, but not when it appears for any and every marketing and advertising initiative under the sun. The Serif Bag by the folks over at Little Factory is a design that I think by design both makes and deserves it’s space in the world. It is such a perfectly simple idea that looks great, and even carries groceries.

(via TheDieLine »)


Dropclock Screensaver

This is a pretty nifty little creation that could revitalize almost any monitor. Personally I have never been very big on screensavers, but this DROPCLOCK is definitely one I could get into. It illustrates the current time with Helvetica numerals dropping into water in super slow motion . I would love to see some behind the scenes stuff on how they shot the footage and coded it.

(via iso50 »)


Asahikada Garage

I can’t really find much information about this structure beyond these photos, but I am totally intrigued by this grownup’s toy room in Hokkaido, Japan. Jun Igarashi Architects were commissioned to design this awesome building to store some beautiful cars and other fast things. See more photos of the Asahikada Garage here.

(via SUBTILITAS »)

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Vik & Fougere

The collaborative efforts of Nils Vik and Thom Fougere, collectively known as Vik & Fougere, are a Tour de Force of functionality and minimalism in simple house hold fixtures and furniture. The favorite of mine has to be their light hook pictured below, which is a nice update to the infinitely boring light switch plaques seen in American homes. In addition to the aesthetic update Nils and Thom have added a nice little hook in the corner for keys, some type of ornament or anything else that your heart desires.

(via The Fox Is Black »)

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Naoto Fukasawa for Artek

Another perfect design from Naoto Fukasawa. This modular shelving system was designed for Artek in 2009 to be debuted at milan design week in 2010 as the finish company was celebrating their 75th birthday. The system was developed based on the modular L-system designed by Alvar Aalto.

“I have always associated (alvar) aalto’s furniture designs, which highlight the graciousness of plain wood, with square building blocks. the basis for this design lies in the image of a plain wood cube with slightly rounded edges. the sections where the shelves and support brace meet affords the design a gentle feel, the kind of feeling that can likewise be attributed to a stack of building blocks with rounded edges. the intersection of the x-shaped brace is fashioned from cast aluminium and has an unadorned, rough feel to it.” – Naoto Fukasawa

(via designboom »)

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Beach Chalet

I have always been intrigued by small spaces and the value of organization to make them work. Also lately I have been researching and sketching a lot of ideas on how to build highly functional, inexpensive small structures. This little oceanside getaway called Beach Chalet designed by Studiomama really fulfills almost all of my criteria and does it beautifully. I could definitely see giving up all my extra junk and permanently relocating to a cozy little place like this. All the great photos of this little wonder are by awesome English Ben Anders.

(via LittleDiggs »)

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Plus Minus Zero Watch

Naoto Fukasawa has always been one of my favorite industrial designers. His designs are so refined that they exist in a perfect balance of simplicity and serenity, always with a high regard to function. So when I saw this watch designed by Fukasawa for Plus Minus Zero I immedietely had to post it. This watch hints at alot of my favorite parts of old military watches and specificaly old Timex watches, but side steps the predictable designs they often employ for the faces and bodies of their timepieces.

(via Minimalissimo »)


The FIDA Mat

The FIDA Mat is a wonderfully compact solution for a lounge chair you could pack up and take anywhere. It was designed by Hannover industrial designer Patrick Frey, and feels like a design update to the classic hiker’s essential, The Crazy Creek.

(via Surfstation »)

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Vanderbilt Studio: David Adjaye

I remember walking by this interesting, albeit slightly unfriendly, modern facade many times while living in Fort Greene, and I had been curious what the back and interior looked like. So my curiosity was answered when I ran into these some beautiful photographs by Nikolas Koenig. This building represents the single residential design by architect David Adjaye in New York City and one of fewer that twenty total residential projects.

(via SUBTILITAS »)

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Hook System: Jean Nouvel

The Hook wall system, designed by french architect Jean Nouvel, is a customizable storage and organization system that combines a perforated metal sheet with attachable modular pieces. The original inspiration is said to be computer punch cards and sheet music. This would solve my home office conundrum, too bad I can’t track down and dimensions or pricing information. Internet fail.

Jean Nouvel:

A metal architecture, like a quotation from Jean Prouvé’s work: rather than a wall this is a continuous building system that encloses joints into the metal folds. And its corrugated skin, regularly perforated and lacquered, turns into a wall. A wall to capture light and liven up the space around it.

(via Minimalissimo »)

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