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Jean Prouvé Industrial Beauty

Industrial designer and architect Jean Prouvé in my opinion is one of the most underrated and forgotten modernist designers. His work laid the ground work for a lot of subsequent styles. Many of which are still prevalent and even hip today. His work was very evidently influenced by the post industrial revolution manufacturing culture and the advent of mass production. In opposition to the changes we have witnessed where mass production has allowed for a drop in the quality of goods. Prouvé used it as an opportunity to make furniture out of materials that were normally used in aircraft and military grade fixtures.

(via Daily Icon »)

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Steve Jobs 1955 – 2011

“Your Time is limited. Don’t waste it living someone else’s life.” – Steve Jobs


Authentic Jobs’ 6th Birthday

Every year for the birthday of his site Authentic Jobs, Cameron Moll launches a campaign to raise money(and awareness) for charity: water. This year the ante has been upped. From last years $17,000 to 600,000 Ethiopian Birr (approximately $35,000). The money raised if successful will go to directly fund a drilling rig that will be able to offer clean drinking water to a large portion of Northern Ethiopia. On a brief aside, how bad ass is the micro site Cameron put together for this campaign?

Want to do your part?


Lådan (Box)

Lådan is one of those modernist designs that supersedes age and becomes timeless. It’s name translates as box, but even in it’s practiced simplicity it holds a certain comfort and warmth that only a true legend like Ralph Erskine could envision. Elements that really make this design come alive are the ones that break out of the minimal palette and inject some whimsical shapes and textures into the house.

(via SUBTILITAS »)

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Pioneers of American Industrial Design Stamps

I rarely make it into a post office living in New York City mainly because the lines are of life threatening length. The past week while I was visiting my parent’s in MA I happened to stop into the local post office and come across these gems. A new stamp set released by the USPS entitled Pioneers of American Industrial Design. Up until a few days ago I had only seen them floating around on blogs. The tactile feel of a sheet a of perforated stamps is just amazing coupled with the beautiful images of design icons. The lineup of designers includes Eliot Noyes, Dave Chapman, Frederick Hurten Rhead, Donald Deskey, Greta von Nessen, and a few others. You can get the stamps in most local post offices or online at the USPS Shop.


Dieter Rams as Little Design as Possible

Phaidon has put out a great new book that showcases the absolute minimalist perfection of Dieter Rams seemingly endless sea of work. Named for Rams’ tenth design principle Good design is As Little Design as Possible. The design of the book itself was handled by Kobi Benezeri, and I do mean handled. For someone of the caliber of Rams the book requires a certain level of finesse. Benezeri employed a sensory mesh printing on the covers and spine of the book, and lots of impeccably printed full bleed photography.

(via SeptemberIndustry »)

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Beats, Rhymes & Life: The Travels of a Tribe Called Quest

Growing up hip-hop and rap had this innate link to skateboarding. De La Soul and Tribe Called Quest were two of the first people I started listening to. The beats and the groove just had something to them that you wanted to skate to. Through my work I actually have had the opportunity to meet and spend sometime with Q-Tip, which for me as a fan for more than half my life was truly inspiring. All that said tomorrow Beats, Rhymes & Life: The Travels of a Tribe Called Quest, a film by Michael Rapaport will be released in New York and Los Angeles.


Donald Judd 101 Spring St.

Artist Donald Judd’s main home and workspace was a cast iron building at 101 Spring St. in SoHo. Design Observer recently published an essay written by Judd in 1989 along with photos Elizabeth Felicella. Together they bring us in beyond what we would normally know and understand about Judd’s work and life. His attention to detail in things beyond his artwork, such as the furniture in his home and the care with which he renovated and restored the 101 Spring St. building. In his essay he touches on how the different businesses and repurposing of it over the years had turned the building into a dark gross place, and he in work to make it livable again he tried to bring it back to it’s original and intended glory. While making it more functional for his needs.

(via Places: Design Observer »)

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Tegut

In this case I must quote my source Erik Spiekermann, “Supermarket brands don’t have to be ugly”. That is a true statement and the wonderful supporting example is of German supermarket chain Tegut. Their branding is anchored down by a proprietary typeface based on Spiekermann’s Officina Sans, and their other collateral elements include other of Spiekermann’s fonts along with ones from Mitja Miklavčič, and Christian Schwartz. For more info about the Tegut brand and their fonts check out the article on Fonts in Use.

(via Erik Spiekermann »)

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The 60s 606 Turns 50

This year a modern classic has it’s half century birthday. The 606 system was originally released and is still on offer from Vitsoe. Designed by one of my all time favorite designers Dieter Rams, the 606 modular shelving and storage system lives at that rare intersection of form and function. Few pieces of furniture and especially modular shelving do their job with such style and grace. No wonder then that the 606 system has remained a staple offering for Vitsoe for fifty years now.


Karel Martens

Anna Craemer has created a wonderful collection of video interviews on design for her personal project entitled Critical Graphic Design.

This particular one is an interview with Karel Martens who is the head of the famed Werkplaats Typografie program. He riffs on curiosity and compares the beauty of imperfect type and design to the great imperfections that make jazz music so great.

(via Frank Chimero »)


Aaron Draplin on Passion

The ever entertaining Aaron Draplin offers up some insight and inspiration in a series of videos shot by Jared Souney for Yobeat and Level. Draplin like many of us grew up in the skateboarding and snowboarding culture of the 80′s and 90′s, and was even lucky enough to test his design on some board graphics and other projects like that. Make sure to check out part two of this interview and a little show and tell with Aaron after the jump.

(via WANKEN »)

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Sol Lewitt Retrospective

Sol Lewitt has always been one of my favorite artists, especially of all the folks in the post modernist movement. It isn’t that I find his pieces overly compelling. His approach to art making was highly original and although it does share some similarities with Andy Warhol and his mass production applied to art making, I think Lewitt does one thing that makes his work so much richer is the idea that the end product is not the art. Creating an often vague instruction of how to create on of his pieces. So anyone who has the instructions can create the piece and each one will always slightly vary from the other. This process based art has influenced so many people to come after. Even this whole making movement that has swept the globe as of late is in the wake of Sol Lewitt and his legacy.

In the exhibition I was most captivated by the videos and photographs of the process of fabricating the exhibit and the paintings. The instructions that were displayed next to some of the pieces in addition to the wall painting number were also awesome. The instructions, however vague being more integral to the piece of art than the final product.

The opening of the Sol Lewitt Retrospective also marked the completion and opening of building #7 at MASS Moca. Don’t worry though you have the next twenty five years to make it up there, as the exhibition is committed there for that long at the least.

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Explorations in Typography

Explorations in Typography by Carolina de Bartolo along with Erik Spiekermann is a wonderful new book on typesetting and how type and typesetting coexist. With the amount of time I have been spending on interface design these days the only question I have after looking at this awesome layout and typesetting resource is when does the web version come out?

(via Surfstation »)


The Five Vignelli-isms

Using some pinnacle quotes that have become almost dogmatic to the design world Michael Beirut created these program designs for a Gala and award presentation at the Architecture League on March 8th. Massimo and his wife Lella were awarded the President’s Medal(past recipients of which include John D. Rockefeller, Jr., Hugh Ferriss, Joseph Urban, Richard Meier, Robert A.M. Stern, and Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown) from the AL “in recognition of a body of work so influential in its breadth that it has shaped the very way we see the world.” And in some ways how we experience and interact with the world, the prime example being Vignelli’s work for the New York Transit system.

One life is too short for doing everything.

We like design to be visually powerful, intellectually elegant, and above all timeless.

If you can design one thing, you can design everything.

If you do it right, it will last forever.

The life of a designer is a life of fight against the ugliness.

(via WANKEN »)


Jeff Bridges: True Grit Book

Who knew until just a few days ago that Jeff Bridges ran a super awesome website? I will say for one I didn’t know. The hand written type and overall vernacular is so personal and unique on the web today I really love the lack of design. His site is really one of the most enriching process archives I have ever come across.

The books Mr. Bridges has put together documenting from his perspective the making of these films is both insightful and amazing. It gives regular Joes like me a glimpse at something I will most likely never get to see. Also the off camera personalities and emotions he captures from his co-stars, and others on the crew, well known and not, are beautiful. The Making of True Grit was the way I came across his site and I think still with stands as my favorite part of the site.


Bass Notes

If you are in the greater London area between now and the 17th of next month you definitely need to check out this show. Bass Notes, a play on the pronunciation of Saul Bass’ last name, is an exhibition entirely composed of Bass’ film posters. Often exalted as his best works.

(via Quipsologies »)


Happy Valentine’s

A tweet just jogged my memory about the Design Love Series on idsgn, which is highly appropriate for today. The quote above is from Massimo Vignelli, and also made an appearance in Gary Hustwit’s Helvetica.


Milton Glaser Quotes from Creative Mornings

Here is a little roundup of my favorite quotes from today’s Creative Mornings, with design legend and all around inspirational thinker Milton Glaser. Check out more photos from the event in the Creative Morning’s Flickr Pool. If you have any other quotes that resonated with you please leave them in the comments section and I would love to add them to the post.

“Certainty is a closing of the mind. To create something new you must have doubt.”

“Fail more often in order to find out what you’re capable of learning.”

“Color is one of those subjects you never fully learn.”

“Failure and ambiguity are hard concepts to sell to a client who just wants to sell more cans of tomatoes.”

“The act of making things that move the mind is our deepest aspiration in seeking the miraculous.”

- Milton Glaser


Milton Glaser on Teaching

“Fundamentally I teach because it makes me feel good. It helped me certainly clarify my own objectives. There’s nothing more exciting than seeing someone’s life affected in a positive way by something you’ve said.”

- Milton Glaser

(via swissmiss »)


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