Category filter: Cabin

House Morran

Falling somewhere between simple modern home and rustic cabin House Morran is both utilitarian, and cozy. A tough balance to strike, but Johannes Norlander Arkitektur seems to do it flawlessly. I also really admire the juxtaposition between the stark black plywood exterior and the soft warmth of the raw wood interior. A renovation goes to show you how much can be aesthetically changed using even a minimal palette like plywood and paint.

(via Cabin Porn »)

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Yeta Cabin

In our hyper connected world I find many people yearn to have a simple escape from it all. A cabin like this one designed by Lab Zero is perfect. The construction is even super cool, with the stacked logs, which I am sure creates a insulated quiet space. Based on the size of this little cabin it bares a large amount of amenities including a photovoltaic system allowing the house to live completely off the grid.

(via WANKEN »)

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Hood Canal Boathouse

Architects Bosworth Hoedemaker revived this building from a 1950s boat shed into a rich light filled little escape. Obvious inspiration was drawn from nautical design and the utilitarian interior ends up being equal parts function and comfort. The Hood Canal Boathouse as it has been named can open up on warm days to embrace the amazing view or be all shuttered up to greet a storm. Simple explorations in living space such as this are really inspiring to me because they help us understand how we can live with less space and thus a smaller foot print.

(via FFFFOUND! »)

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Eagle Ridge Residence

After a visit to Orcas Island many years ago the client for Eagle Ridge Residence decided she would one day live there. Decades went by and finally she was able to purchase a small forested lot with a variety of trees and views looking out over the San Jaun and Canadian Gulf Islands. Gary Gladwish Architects solved the design for this house by creating equal parts finished and unfinished space. The section that was left raw is for both storage and studio space, but will eventually be converted to more additional living space. Another important aspect of the design are the glass walls, which were constructed in such a way that they can slide out of the way opening the interior to nature and in turn the views.

(via Daily Icon »)

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Cabin on Flathead Lake

I find myself posting about Andersson-Wise multiple times per week and I think that is a true testament to the skill.

Amongst ponderosa pines and looking out over a shale cliff onto Montana’s Flat Head Lake this modern cabin is equally a home as it is an observation point. From he protected porch or the cantilevered deck that juts out into the trees I can definitely see how you could just sit back and take in the beauty of the outdoors. An ever increasing need I feel is to have a greater, or at least stronger bond and friendship between architecture and nature.

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Scandinavian Coastal Home

I have had a growing infatuation for cabins and architecture which is related to a similar minimalist and naturalist need and aesthetic. A style I have always loved for it’s corky vernacular design, but also for its simple functional sensibilities are the coastal and beachside homes of Scandinavia.

(via Cabin Porn »)

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Tower House

The work of Andersson-Wise is always inspiring and each project is so unique, while embodying their style and sensibilities.

“In considering an addition to the original stone lodge at this Lake Travis property in Texas, USA, the notion of a tower was born out of several factors: taking advantage of views, minimizing the footprint on the site, and accommodating the rising flood plain elevation.”

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Summer House in Trosa

Sitting somewhere between a modernist home, and a deep woods cabin this simple Summer House in Trosa was designed by Widjedal Racki Bergerhoff architects.

(via M Stetson »)

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House in Pirque

Perched on a hillside in Pirque this house has been designed for a simpler type of living. Everything having it’s own place is an easy concept to grasp, but in practice only works if you don’t have too many things. This little cabin shows how to do it. Designed by 332 Arquitectos this cabin has been stripped down to the bare essentials.

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City Cottage

To getaway you don’t always have to go a great distance. This little cottage built in Helsinki is only a little over a mile from their family home offers the perfect type of minimalist getaway in a small intimate little structure. Every detail, object and fixture had to be perfect, as the space is only 150 square feet. Low energy consumption and the natural setting of this house make it an ecologically sound vacation option when compared to driving or flying somewhere. Finnish culture holds nature in a place of great respect and that even comes through in their city planning where camping areas and parks are designed right into the fabric of cities. Also because of it’s small scale this little building makes virtually zero impact and can be powered entirely by solar energy. The design for the cottage was done by Verstas Architects a Helsinki based firm.

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Tillamook Forest Interpretive Center

Tillamook State Forest in Oregon is home to a mind blowing new education center. The 14,000 plus square foot space is dedicated to educating visitors about the history of the Tillamook Burn, which consumed an area greater than 355,000 acres around 60 years ago. My favorite detail of this center designed by Miller Hull Architects is the 250 foot suspension bridge, which spans from the site to an existing camping area.

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Coromandel Beach House

This utilitarian beach getaway in New Zealand was designed by Crosson Clarke Carnachan Architects with a subtle rustic exterior and a magnificently crafted interior. The design also really maximizes the view with an aircraft carrier scale deck and a broad opening from the living space of the house directly out on it.

(via SUBTILITAS »)

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House in a Forest Nagano

Architect Go Hasegawa is known for his approach of investigating the connection and play between a houses inside and outside spaces. Here the house and it’s design create a massive protected concrete deck to entertain a large group of friends and family. The design itself also mimics the slender trees of it’s surroundings

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Waldhaus

This new house built in a pine forest in Brandenburg was designed to fit in with it surroundings both natural and manmade. In contrast it has details that make certain aspects stick out, such as the white painted window framing, which alludes to the stark white interior. The design of Waldhaus was carried out by Atelier St. I think by far my favorite part has to be the kitchen. It is the only part of the house where the raw color and texture of wood has been left and I think it really brightens up and makes that room feel more lively.

(via SUBTILITAS »)

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Jay Nelson’s Domes

Artist Jay Nelson creates unique organic architecture works that fall somewhere between the homes of hobbits and surfer shacks. Unique engineering and simplistic use of materials make his work innately human. Nelson grew up chasing waves and building beach shacks on the California cost. With a USC physics professor for a father you can assume his buildings where much more complex than your normally beach shanty. After attending both CCA and Bard College Nelson holds tight to his surfer roots creating richly inhabitable little pods.

(via The Bold Italic »)

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False Bay Writer’s Cabin

Recently I have seen quite a bit more architecture in the vain of cabins and vacation homes that cut through the conventions. Bigger is better and lavish is living. After living in New York City for a few years I have learned that space is a commodity, but like a $20 Martini you can make do without. From a closet sized room in a small apartment to an even smaller apartment I share with a girlfriend and a dog I have learned both to share, shed unneeded things, and above all maximize space.

I have posted about Olson Kundig Architects before mainly because there work is unique, slightly industrial while still being homey. The function and craft behind their work shows through. In the case of their False Bay Writer’s Cabin they have created a tiny minimal retreat, which when it is not being used can fold up and protect itself from the elements.

(via Dwell »)

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