Category filter: Architecture

Great Barrier House

Named after its locale, Great Barrier House resided on Great Barrier Island off the coast of Auckland, New Zealand. Working closely with architects Crosson Clarke Carnachan they were able to create a highly sustainable solution that also fit their living requirements.

(via SUBTILITAS »)

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Heliotrope Raising

Bang Architectes as a solution for an addition to a Paris home created this awesome wood-framed building called Heliotrope Raising. A portion of the structure is raised above the ground leaving the backyard fully accessible. These great photographs of the finished addition were shot by Julien Lanoo.

(via SUBTILITAS »)

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Holmenkollen Ski Jump

The newly completed Holmenkollen Ski Jump is an amazing site. Designed by Julien De Smedt Architects the update to a normally very bland sport complex is stunning. The observation skybox is definitely one of the most amazing parts. Despite it’s abnormal function the structure integrates very well with it’s surroundings.

(via The Fox Is Black »)

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Wieden+Kennedy HQ

This first time I caught a glimpse of the Wieden+Kennedy headquarters in Portland was in the film Art & Copy. The space itself is truly amazing, unparalleled, and gives new validity to the idea that a creatively designed workspace is a better place to do creative work. The design itself was concocted by Allied Works Architecture, which is a wonderful solution for this project and the existing structure was built within. The biggest and most prominent element of the design to me is that it has been built around an amphitheatre style performance space. All the other sections and work areas branch off around it. This sense of communal space that brings all the other parts of the company and physical working environment together is a great idea.

(via ArchDaily »)


Huski Lodge

Huski Lodge is a boutique hotel in the Victorian Highlands of Australia. It was designed by Elenberg Fraser based on studies of snowflake geometry and Australian timber framing. The faceted design and positioning on the site work together maximize views and light in each of the separate apartments. It is intriguing to think that the architects studied snowflakes in the design of this building when you see the way the building and snow interact with one another as if they were old friends.

(via SUBTILITAS »)

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Gregg’s Cycles New HQ

When designing a retail space for Gregg’s Cycle in Bellevue, Washington Weinstein AU decided to create a building that literally put the bikes out front, and really leverages it’s design to highlight the bicycles. Instead of submitting to the norm and creating another street level retail experience with limited parking Weinstein AU opted for a raised concrete design that provides protected parking below along with easy access to the rear of the building and more parking out back. It also physically boosts the bikes up towards the sky, which definitely accentuates their concept of highlighting the bikes.

This style of, product first retail design is becoming more prevalent. One specific instance that the Gregg’s Cycle reminded me of is the Freitag Flagship Store in Zurich. Design that is both relevant to the brand, it’s products and also develops a customized approach to display that is only applicable to their specific goods and location really creates a richer and more unique shopping experiences. This thought process or equation can and should be applied to other media and applications.

(via ArchDaily »)

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Haus K

Haus K is a nice simple design by Yes Architecture, many of the aesthetic cues are taken from local architecture so the house could harmonize with it’s surroundings. The brick structure they built on top of was originally a wine cellar and one room wine press, and instead of demolishing the existing structure and building in it’s place the architects chose to use it’s existing brick layout as a foundation of sorts for the new house. I only wish there was some better information and more images of Haus K available.

(via SUBTILITAS »)


Skilift Carmenna

I posted about Bearth & Deplazes previously here, and for the second time I have stumbled across their work and been completely enamored. They design these amazing solutions for extremely remote building sites and for structures that usually have little design. This project Skilift Carmenna they designed both integrates with the natural environment, in winter it is cover in snow and summer the roof is grass covered, but it also adds a level of visual interest to what is normally a bland utilitarian structure.

Due to the location of this project, the ski area is in Arosa, Switzerland the material choice had to be very specific. Everything needed to be light and easily transportable by helicopter. So they chose simple things like plastic and corrugated metal sheeting, wood. Despite this minimalist palette they were able to create astounding modern building that truly fit their purpose and surroundings. That to me is part of what defines architecture.

(via SUBTILITAS »)

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Artist Bridge Studio

Designing to create more space while minimizing impact on the natural landscape is a tall order, but Safdie Rabines Architects did just that to create this floating studio space in San Diego, California. The space connects the main home to the more secluded and previously unused portion of the lot, which also appears to have a nice knoll to it. A long skinny plan like this reminds me of train cars, or shipping containers, which I love. Looking for design inspiration in utilitarian objects is often well rewarded.

(via ArchDaily »)


CHICO: by Atelier KUU

CHICO is a designer store for dogs and their owners in Shizuoka, Japan. Designed by Nobuo Kumazara, of Atelier Kuu, this shop truly exemplifies their aesthetic sensibilities and skills. The elegance and serenity exhibited by their designs add a layer of comfort to minimalism that is awesome. I know my little man Ernest and I would have great time shopping here, I might lose track of him on the concrete floors though. The dog house shaped dog door that exits out onto grass area for the pups to play is probably the most amazing detail.

(via Spoon & Tamago »)

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Giant Office Supplies

When London based developer Land Securities was seeking to rent out workspaces in a newly completed open plan space they wanted to find a creative way of visually divide the spaces. This way potential tenants would have better idea of the different shapes and sizes of spaces that were available. To solve this problem Radford Wallis was hired to design what turned out to be these awesome sculptures Giant Office Supplies. At absurd scale to their normal world counterparts this objects interact beautifully with the sparse architectural space.

“Shunning conventional signage, we went for maximum impact by creating four scaled-up stationery items, used to mark out the huge space,” Radford Wallis says. “The giant objects were then positioned where the partitions would eventually be built.”

(via swissmiss »)

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Tea House

I meant to post this along time ago, but it just sort of floated in my drafts until today. This design for a Tea House by David Jameson Architects is an amazing act of simplicity. The minimalist approach truly does justice to the history and practice of tea as it is done in Japan. I also really appreciate this building from the standpoint of it being a great solution to designing a simple and small out building. Albeit the huge i-beams seem a tad excessive.

(via NOTCOT »)

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Vogt Magglingen

This renovation, which is better described as a transformation, by Kistler Vogt Architects updates a classic farmhouse into a modern home that balances it’s history with new minimalist interiors. Often in architecture use of clashing materials or styles can create something completely new beautiful. Here the classic roof tiles are juxtaposed with the large glass expanses which break up the original exterior walls.

(via SUBTILITAS »)


House in Ookayama

Working on an extremely skinny lot, and with some serious restrictions, Torafu Architects were able to create this open flowing design for a two family home. Entitled House in Ookayama, this house invokes loft living with an approach to storage and function that lofts don’t usually conquer.

(via Spoon & Tamago »)

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Houses of the Hudson Valley

After coming across the work of Thomas Phifer in Dwell this week I immediately signified with his minimalist style with a focus on light open spaces. Another thing I that really stood out to me was his residential commissions are located in pockets in close proximity to one another. The group that caught my attention the most are the houses in the Hudson Valley. I grew up in Columbia County and the Berkshires and all the towns these homes are in bring up nostalgic memories from my childhood.

(via Dwell »)

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Y-House

The Y-House is a nice little structure in Obama, Fukui, Japan with a modern exterior and some beautiful exposed post and beam construction on the inside. A playful contrast between dark rich materials on the outside and light colors and exposed wood inside makes for a cozy interior space. The residential designs by TOFU stand out to me as their most considered and resolved work.

(via ArchDaily »)

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Mini Maison

This beautiful conversion of a row worker’s house in Brussels, by architects Vanden Eeckhoudt-Creyf‘s is a beautiful exercise in efficiency. Taking a small space like this Mini Maison and organizing it in such a way that it feels airy and open while still separating the different spaces of the house is a feet of skill. I really love the way they have pushed some of the modern elements to the exterior of the building, thus giving passersby a glimpse at the modern aesthetic of the interior.

(via NOTCOT »)

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Monte Rosa Hütte

This irregular hexagon that both blends into and juts out of the Swiss Alps is the Neue Monte Rosa-Hütte. Designed as an upgrade from the original structure built in the 19th century, architects Bearth and Deplazes have created a beautiful solution for this remote site. It’s wood-framing references the style and technique of previous structure, while the technical aspects both inside and out help to make it inherently new. The building itself is 100 percent self sufficient and must be able to create energy on site because of it’s remoteness. Building materials were delivered partially assembled in an estimated 3000 helicopter trips, mainly because mules were said to be too costly. Monte Rosa Hütte operates as both a restaurant and lodge for hikers traveling the 3 hours from the base of Monte Rosa.

(via The Fox Is Black »)


Chicken Point Cabin

Between the magnificent window wall (30 feet by 20 feet), which opens to the water, and the utilitarian use of materials Chicken Point Cabin is a definite dream cabin. Amazingly enough the design for this cabin by Olson Kundig Architects can also accommodate ten people.

(via iso50 »)

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Miner’s Refuge

Posting from the road. I am currently in San Salvador on a trip around central America, and I am attempting to continue posting along the way.

I wanted to share this awesome house called Miner’s Refuge designed by the talented folks over at Johnston Architects. The interesting use of aluminum siding here is highly impressive.

(via ArchDaily »)

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